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The Cyclist's Guide To: Boulder July 18 2017

Racing bikes has it's perks. The Orucase team has traveled and raced all over the world. This has given us a unique, on the ground (or in the saddle) view of all the major cycling destinations across the US.

Red, White, and Blue (and Green and Gold) July 05 2017

Collegiate cycling was a definite highlight of our cycling careers.

The race venues were top notch, as were our competitors.  There's not one other collegiate sport I'm aware of that had current professional riders racing. In 2008, as a senior, Isaac Howe missed out after getting caught in a crash inside 1 to go, sitting 4th wheel. Luckily, in 2009 we struck gold.

 UVM nationals cycling

 

It all started in January when Will Dugan won the D1 Cyclocross National Championship race. With the road season coming up we wanted to clean up, and dominate the collegiate scene. The University of Vermont had always been a strong team, and had had some luck at nationals in the past, but could never consistently compete against the big powerhouse schools like CU Boulder, Lees-McRae, and UC Davis, amongst others.

 To make matters even harder, Nationals was scheduled to take place in Fort Collins, Colorado. But we showed up ready to rumble.

 

The Road Race

On Saturday we had the road race. A challenging circuit that ascended up Horsetooth Reservoir and completed some super windy laps on a rolling section before reversing and heading back to the stadium. Hitting it out from the gun Will Dugan, and Jamey Driscoll found themselves off the front alone.  Eventually an elite group caught them and the race settled a bit before heading back over the climbs to the finish. On a climb about 10 miles out Jamey put in an attack that saw him go solo. With Will marking moves Jamey was able to hold onto a 30 second gap to roll in solo for the win. As the second group, at this point only comprising of 5 riders, Will jumped them early with 1k to go to finish 2nd.

 

The Criterium

With Jamey and Will leading the Men's omnium, we decided to go all in and lead me out for the win in the Criterium. If they could hold on to a high enough place they might be able to retain their position in the omnium, but the main goal was the win. I knew if I made it to the last corner the sprint was mine, so we opted to try and keep it together for a field sprint.

With 5 laps to go, a group of 5 very strong riders started to roll away. It was in this split second where I could have easily jumped across that I decided to stick to the plan and let Jamey and Will keep it covered. I had complete trust that they could bring it back, especially after schooling the field the day before.

Vermont Leadout Train Criterium National Championships

Jamey set the pace from 5-3 laps to go, keeping the break just a handful of seconds up the road. With 2 to go, Will did a lap full gas at 30+ MPH bringing the break within 5 seconds. Jamey took it up once more and was able to catch the break with 3 turns to go, and then panic struck. With Will and Jamey blown at this point we caught the break, but didn't pull past them and were swarmed going into the last section of 3 quick turns before the finishing straight. I yelled at our last teammate Alex Cox to go as fast as he could as he dropped me off on the inside of the last turn. I ended up coming out of the last turn in 10-15th place and started my sprint immediately.

Within 1 pedal stroke I knew I had it. I came up the inside and broke the sound barrier as I passed 3rd, and 2nd place within 10 meters of the finish line. As I rolled across the line I pointed the the UVM logo on our skinsuits. We had just won 3 national titles in one year.

Colin Jaskiewicz Vermont Collegiate National Criterium Champion 2009

 


Five Pro Tips for International and Long-Haul Bike Travel June 27 2017

With years of travel experience under our belts, there are a few things we have learned to pay attention to when taking long flights or extended trips overseas. Follow these tips to make the most out of your next adventure! 

Seven Essential Non-Cycling Items for the Bicycling Nomad June 12 2017

At Orucase, our mission is to get your bike from where you are to where you want to be as safely, conveniently, and inexpensively as possible. But once you’ve Ninja’d your bike past the check-in counter and onto the baggage belt, you may feel your travel experience is at the mercy of the terminal layout, the weather, or your fellow passengers

Denier Explained May 16 2017

What is denier and how does it affect bike travel cases?

Here's what Wikipedia has to say about denier:

Denier /ˈdɛnjər/ or den (abbreviated D), a unit of measure for the linear mass density of fibers, is the mass in grams per 9000 meters of the fiber. The denier is based on a natural reference: a single strand of silk is approximately one denier; a 9000-meter strand of silk weighs about one gram. The term denier comes from the French denier, a coin of small value.

Essentially, denier is a measurement of the thickness of the fibers that make up a material. As denier goes up weight and the durability of the material go up. For example, both panty hose and bullet proof vests are made out of nylon. Panty hose clocks in at around 10 denier, bullet proof vests tend to be 1080.

Orucase airport ninja bike case ballistic nylon fabric

Most bag manufacturers tend to use 1000d ballistic nylon as the material of choice. At Orucase we’ve gone one step further, as all of our cases use 1680d ballistic nylon. We want your Airport Ninja bike case to last forever, and Orucase where no compromise engineering, design and cycling experience meet.

...the Airport Ninja uses material that is 163% stronger than other soft cases.

If you compare the strength of these materials you’ll immediately see the difference. 1000d ballistic nylon measures about 290 newtons in tearing strength. 1680d ballistic nylon measures in at 475 newtons. That means the Airport Ninja is 163% stronger than other soft cases. We know what we’d rather use to transport our bikes…

 

Stop paying bike fees.

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only bicycle case designed by cyclists to avoid excess baggage fees. We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for any sized bike. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

orucase airport ninja


Red Hook Crit Brooklyn No. 10 Recap May 02 2017

If social media is your source, then the infamous carnage of Red Hook arguably exceeds all other aspects of the race. What make matters worse is whenever you ask someone what it's like they usually start shaking their heads, fumble over a few words to finally settle with "dude, it's f*cking crazy". In hindsight it makes sense that 30 minutes prior to my morning qualifying heat I found myself nearly shaking with nerves and a pounding heart that made speaking normally almost impossible. I was terrified and clearly I'd lost my edge. 
 
With a year of no racing and 10% of the training I'd ever done prior to starting a season, I had no clue what to expect. My game plan to "be a student of the race" was not only tacky but it backfired and I found myself obsessing over my competitors, their bikes, warm-up routines, and their grins as they wound up their wind trainers in the 80 degree sun. For a moment there I just copied them, completely forgetting everything I've learned over two decades of racing.
 
Isaac Orucase Aventon Red Hook Crit
 
I'm not sure if the hollers from other racers toward me in the first laps were from confusion over the persisting neck twitch that I can't seem to shake, or if I was racing as wound up as I was feeling inside. Honestly, I think it was the neck but either way it doesn't matter because 3 laps in I realized this was absolutely nothing like I feared and the nerves completely went away. 
 
Immediately I forgot I was on a track bike, I was there just railing the course like the hundreds of crits I'd done before. Had my lips not been stuck to my dry, dehydrated mouth I'm sure I would have let out a slightly arrogant smirk realizing how unbelievably different things are going to be come Red Hook #2 in London. I qualified 9th in my heat earning me a starting position in 42nd for the big show at 9:30 that night. 
 
The rest of the day was easy. Admittedly I was a bit surprised how fatigued my legs were because I never felt like I went hard in the qualifiers. The Red Hook Brooklyn course is super narrow and technical, similar to the Mandalay Bay Vegas Crit but much narrower in some spots.  We just never went that fast (25-27mph) and it was a lot of slowing down and sprinting back up to speed. 
 
 
The main event would be a whole different story. From the moment the race started it was a spun out sprint into he first 180 degree right turn, then immediately into another 180 degree left turn. Since no one has brakes you have to slow with your legs and often skidding your rear wheel intermittently to scrub speed is the most efficient way to slow down, by the time I made it to the turn I was riding through a plume of tire smoke. It sounds rad, I know, and that's because it is. What it's not though is scary, here's why. 
 
In American crit racing you have to be mindful about the bro in front of you who's going to clip a pedal doing something stupid through a corner, and at the same time you also have to never forget about the chump behind you who's going to try to squeeze past you through a non-existent gap to advance one position. You don't get this in fixie racing as much because everyone has to pedal through all the turns and since slowing down takes so much more time generally people are slotted into position prior to even making the turn. However, it's that slow braking that makes fixie racing scary because you have fewer options in avoiding crashes, and the lack of rapid braking or speed modulation makes bailing out from sketchy maneuvers less manageable.
 
At one point I felt like all I was doing was anticipating the crash and then moving out of the way to avoid from being caught up in the enviable pileup. That happened about 10 times because I rode 30 guys back for most the race. It's not unlike any other race in that sense, if I was at the front that would happen less. 
 
For a while I struggled with advancing positions. It could be because I'm not super strong right now and I couldn't just wind it up a little faster on the straightaways, and since cornering offers minimal opportunity for movement I only moved up by passing people when they crashed or once it past the 20 minute mark and many riders started to tire.
 
At 8 laps to go I realized everyone was backing off the gas much sooner before the first 180 degree turn then they had earlier in the race and I found that if I just punched it through that extra 200 meters I could pass bounds of people with not much extra effort. In two laps I was in the company of my teammates and the others composing the top in the field. 
 
Unfortunately, that next lap a bad crash occurred and due to its severity a red flag was pulled and the field was neutralize. We lined up to restart once the riders were safely off the course but all that compounded fatigue and distance between groups on the course that landed the entire Aventon team in the top bunch was instantly gone when we started again seeing 5 to go. 
 
We ended up finishing with a rider in the top ten but I was of no help getting him there. The gun went off and it was like the fight I went through at the beginning of the race all over again. I stayed safe, tested my limits, but rolled in at 28th. I was stoked although I don't think much of that excitement stems from my result but rather the relief that I avoided any and all of the potential outcomes that had me nervous at the start earlier that morning. 
 
I'm so thankful for Aventon bikes for giving me the opportunity to be a part of this incredible team and race series. It's just two months until the next Redhook in London and I'm feeling really good about where I'll be come race day. 

Redhook #1 April 29 2017

Redhook criterium is tonight. By now most people have heard of this wild race series which resembles traditional American criterium racing mixed with fixed gear track bikes, but what you may not have heard is that I'm firing up to race the series with Aventon Bikes factory racing team

My last race was with Champion System / Stan's NoTubes in central China in October of 2015. Since then I've checked most the boxes of what washed up pros do once they readjust the lens with which they see the world; I moved to Southern California, got a job, moved in with my girlfriend, started surfing, spearfishing, got drunk on a few Friday nights, and started telling stories to non-cyclists about how great it was being a pro cyclist. All things considered it's been a great year and a half. 

For the first year I barely even wanted to touch my bike. The battle in my head over the sport persisted ever since I first took a paycheck to ride. After having been raised in what most would consider a low income family, racing opened doors for me that I couldn't have ever dreamt possible and it fueled me to work harder and harder at the sport. I got to travel the world and spend everyday tweaking and perfecting my training so I could be the best when it came time to race, the simplicity of being an athlete was so beautiful in that way and for a while I was chomping at the bit to be the best. On the other hand, as time passed concerns grew over what sacrifices was I making to my long term wellbeing. What was I going to do about my mounting student loan debt, lack of retirement savings, and what career opportunities would afford me the ability to tackle these major concerns down the road. Those fears are what increasingly kept me up at night and ultimately what lead me to focus on growing Orucase and not so much on cycling. 
 
After giving up racing and really focusing on my career I'm so relieved to say that I'm in a much better place now and whenever I go out riding my enjoyment for the sport isn't consumed by the troubles that it once caused for my life. Riding now is what it once was, fun!
 
isaac howe aventon orucase red hook crit brooklyn
More recently riding has been a way to branch out to my new community, in fact that's how I got connected with Aventon and the manager of the team Sean Burke. We met at a somewhat rowdy holiday party in December where he made the best tipsy sales pitch enticing me to start racing again, it was incredible. I'll spare him the reenactment but I dusted my bike off not long after hangover wore off. 
 
The team is super cool. Basically Redhook is whatever I want it to be. Obviously the team wants to win but none of us are full-time anymore. Given the history of the riders on our team, I think Sean knows that we all hold ourselves to a higher standard and we'll all do everything we can to be ready come race day. I sure know that I want to win, but I know these things take time and this is a whole new sport for me. A year of surfing hasn't done for my riding as it's done for my beach bod! For now, I need to be a student of the race and prove my value to the team by focusing on how I can be a good teammate and learn from those more suited to chase after the win tonight! 
 
There are four Redhook races this year. My plan is to use this blog as a forum to memorialize my experiences back in the competitive scene, as well as expand the attention being brought to the fixie crit scene and the creations Orucase is coming up with to assist with this growing sport. 
 
Wish me luck!

The Cave April 25 2017

In Plato’s Allegory of the Cave he has Socrates describe a group of people who have been imprisoned in a cave since birth.

These prisoners are chained such that they can only see a wall and the shadows projected onto it by a fire that sits behind them. Unable to move, and having never experienced anything else, these shadows have become reality for the prisoners, even receiving names. Seeking comfort, these prisoners have no desire to leave the cave (or even knowledge that it is possible).

One day, the prisoners chains are broken, and as they climb up out of the cave they come to realize that reality was not as they thought. This is how Socrates describes a philosopher; a prisoner freed from the cave, knowing that the shadows on the wall are a manufactured or perceived reality, and that the true nature of what is real exists outside this realm.

The cave

 The Cave exists for cyclists as well. In our case, we’re hesitant to enter the cave, or red zone. It’s uncharted territory, the deeper you go, you become less and less sure you’ll be able to return.

Every cyclist has encountered this zone, and the longer you race the most you explore and come the realize the true extent of the cave. Each time you upgrade to a new category, whether your first race in the 5’s or your first Pro/1/2, you go deeper. Where you might once have been the strongest rider, you are now being dragged through the cave by a field of much stronger riders, punching above your limit. It becomes akin to free diving, a sport where divers under their own power try to achieve the deepest dive possible, being sure the have enough for the return journey to the surface. In racing at this level it becomes more of a getting dragged to depths you didn’t think were possible, and attempting to make it back to the surface.

The deeper you go, with your vision narrowing, your eyes going cross. You experience a state you wish you could explain to non athletes. It gives you a glimpse of what other athletes experience, and an appreciation for the heroic efforts seen.

the cave

Like any good manufactured reality, as you continue the exploration of the cave, what once was an aversion to it, becomes a yearning. Now as you experience the pain that envelopes your existence, you realize this is what every other rider is experiencing as well. In this transcendental moment you become the hammer. You pour on the hurt, trying to go the deepest you’ve ever gone, knowing that some will try to follow and others will be unable to. You enter uncharted depths and start to get a glimpse of the true nature of reality.


5 Tips For Packing Your Bike In Any Case. April 11 2017

We've collected some tips to help you pack your bike in any case that will help minimize damage and get you and your bike to your destination in one piece.

The Orucase team has been flying domestically and internationally with bikes for the last 15 years, and has learned the tricks of the trade for flying with bicycles. Read our list below, and check out last week's blog post on:

 

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SOFT AND HARD BIKE CASES? DO I NEED A HARD CASE TO PROTECT MY BIKE? DO SOFT CASES EVEN WORK?

 

Here's our list of tips for packing your bike in any case:

 

Dropout Protectors

Whether you're using a hardcase built to double as a fallout shelter, a cardboard box, or our Airport Ninja, we recommend using dropout protectors. These will protect your frame from compressive loads when baggage handlers drop, throw, (or practice their shot put throws) your case. The protectors can be taped to further secure them. Any local bike shop should have these laying around from shipments.

dropout protector

 

Do not leave home without these!

 

Remove Rear Derailleur

Removing your rear derailleur will help ensure that your derailleur hanger makes it to your destination in one piece. In theory, removing your derailleur will not affect your shifting, so don't feel uncomfortable removing it if tuning up your shifting is out of your skill range for now.

 

the bike shop wanted to charge me retail ($4500) to take the hanger off...

 

Carry A Spare Derailleur Hanger

Carry a spare derailleur hanger with you. This is an inexpensive piece that can be hard to find on the road depending on what brand bike you ride. It's also one of the easiest pieces to break during transport. One year at National Championships the TSA ended up breaking a derailleur hanger on my Time VXRS. We were in a new location, didn't know any of the local bike shops. Because Time paints over the derailleur hanger bolts, the bike shop wanted to charge me retail ($4500) to take the hanger off... Needless to say I opted not to do that. Luckily, Wheels Manufacturing was 10 miles away. We drove there and everyone picked up a few spares for $20 a piece.

 

Tighten All Bolts

After removing your seat post, stem, and even bottle cages, be sure to re tighten any bolts. The worst is when through the rattling and shaking around of a flight, or the automated baggage sorting system, that a bolt becomes loose and disappears.

 

Shoes and Pedals

In a worst case scenario (more common than we'd all like) of a bike not making it to your destination on time, having your pedals and shoes in your carry on can make it much more enjoyable (and easy) to set up a borrowed or rental bike. This can make the difference in being able to ride or not. Besides, it's much more likely that you'll find a size 54cm bike versus a pair of 41.5E shoes with custom insoles and your speedplay pedals with 2 wedges...

 

Bonus Tip

 

Skip The Baggage Fees

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only bicycle case designed by cyclists to avoid excess baggage fees. We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for any sized bike. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

 

Orucase airport ninja bicycle case


Soft vs Hard? Or What Bike Cases And Tacos Have In Common. April 04 2017

 

What’s the difference between soft and hard bike cases? Do I need a hard case to protect my bike? Do Soft cases even work?

 

At Orucase we’ve used them all. We’ve started with hand-me-down hard cases, bought nicer ones down the road that we then handed down, and experimented with everything in between before designing the Airport Ninja. Here’s what we’ve learned.

 

 

Everyone knows how to use a zipper, even TSA agents…

 

We’ve had more equipment broken using hard cases: wheels, derailleur hangars, and more. While potentially offering more protection against large impacts and being tossed around, the non-intuitive packing process, including closing most hardshell clamshell designs leave it open to being improperly repacked by TSA agents. In our experience this has been the leading cause of damage to our bikes (and damage to our hard cases).

 

Why lug around a 50lb, oversized case, that costs you $150 each way if it doesn’t offer the protection you need?

 

This lead to the design of our reinforced soft shell design. We use the heaviest grade Cordura for abrasion resistance. Inside we’ve got sheets of HDPE plastic to protect against sharp impacts, which are backed up by multiple densities of foam to spread, and diffuse the impact on the bike  Topping this all up is a plastic #10 tooth YKK zipper. Everyone knows how to use a zipper, even TSA agents. On top of that, the plastic teeth resist breaking and bending like metal zippers and can handle more force without popping.

In short, the softshell design of our case provides the protection needed, while simplifying the packing process, which lowers the risk of damage due to handling by the TSA.

Soft: 2 (bike cases and tacos) - hard: 0.

 

Orucase airport ninja think outside the box

 

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only bicycle case designed by cyclists to avoid excess baggage fees. We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for any sized bike. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

learn more orucase airport ninja


Ninja's For Hire! April 01 2017

Today we introduce the next generation offering from Orucase: your own personal ninja!

Pay a one time fee and you can have your own trained ninja to sneak your bicycle on to the plane with no excess baggage fees, guaranteed or your money back! There's no bike too big or too small just like our Airport Ninja Bike Travel Case. These ninjas are the best money can buy, we select only ninjas from the best secret ninja training centers. Only ninja masters in infiltration and disguise are selected, some are even said to be able to shapeshift and turn invisible, just what you need on your next trip with your bike!

Be sure to buy your ninja today! Supplies are limited!

orucase ninja flying kick interbike

 

Not quite sure you need a trained ninja everytime you fly? For the rest of us, Our Airport Ninja Bike Travel Case is the next best thing.

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only bicycle case designed by cyclists to avoid excess baggage fees. We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for any sized bike. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

 orucase airport ninja bike travel case


30 Facts You Didn’t Know About The Cobbled Classics. March 27 2017

The cobbled classics are the most prestigious one day events in the world of road cycling.

Outshining the Tour de France to most cycling fans, the classics manage to jam pack everything that is great about cycling into one brutal day. A very, very long day, the cobbled classics range in distance from 200 to 260 kilometers. While flatter than the Ardennes there can still be a lot of climbing.  The Tour of Flanders clocks in at over 2500 meters (8,500 feet +) of climbing. All that split up over 18 or so cobbled climbs that max out over 20% grade.

Held through March and April, the four cobbled classics consist of E3 Harelbeke, Gent-Wevelgem, De Ronde van Vlaanderen, and Paris-Roubaix.

Route pavée crt 2002.jpg

By F Lamiot - F Lamiot (Own work), CC BY 2.5, Link

 

Dwars door Vlaanderen

First Edition: 1945
Most wins per country: Belgium, 54.

 

E3 Harelbeke

First Edition: 1958
Nickname: The little Tour of Flanders
Most Wins: Belgian Tom Boonen holds the record of victories with five wins, trailed by cycling icon Rik Van Looy who won four times.
Fastest Edition: 2003 when Dutchman Steven de Jongh won at an average speed of 45.9 km/h.

  

Gent–Wevelgem

First Edition: 1934
Most Wins: Gent-Wevelgem was won three times by Robert Van Eenaeme (1936, 1937 and 1945), Rik Van Looy (1956, 1957 and 1962), Eddy Merckx (1967, 1970 and 1973) and Tom Boonen (2004, 2011 and 2012). Mario Cipollini was victorious in 1992, 1993 and 2002.

  

Tour of Flanders

First Edition: 1913
Most Victories: Six men hold the record of most victories, making the Tour of Flanders unique among the major classics. Belgians Achiel Buysse, Eric Leman, Johan Museeuw and Tom Boonen, Italian Fiorenzo Magni and Swiss Fabian Cancellara each have three victories.
Closest margin of victory: In 1994 Bugno beat Museeuw by 7 mm in a four-man sprint, the smallest margin in history.
Prizes: For more than half a century, organizers have offered prizes and bonuses to the first riders on many of the climbs. In 1940 the first rider up the Kwaremont, Edelare and Kruisberg won 500 francs. A combined prize for best climber on all the hills came in 1950, when Maurits Blomme won bedroom furniture. The prize at the top of the Kruisberg in 1953 was a washing machine; the first up the Muur of Geraardsbergen won 18,000 francs. In 1950 Fiorenzo Magni won 30,000 francs in bonuses during a long breakaway.
Steepest Climb: The Koppenberg maxes out at 22%
Longest Edition: The longest Tour of Flanders was its first running in 1913: 324 kilometers
Shortest Edition: The shortest Tour of Flanders was the war-time edition of 1941: 198 kilometers
Fastest Edition: 2001, won by Italian Gianluca Bortolami: 43.6 km/h average.
Slowest Edition: 1923, won by Swiss Heiri Suter: 26,2 km/h average.
Most Races Completed By a Rider: Briek Schotte, who participated 20 consecutive times from 1940 to 1959.
Most Consecutive Victories: Only one rider (Fiorenzo Magni) won three consecutive victories.
Biggest Margin of Victory: The biggest margin between the winner and runner-up was in 1969, when Eddy Merckx won by a margin of 5 minutes 36 seconds over second-place finisher Felice Gimondi.
Youngest Winner: Rik Van Steenbergen in 1944 at 19 years and 206 days.
Oldest Winner: Andrei Tchmil in 2000 at 37 years and 71 days.

 

Paris-Roubaix

First Edition: 1896
Most races completed by a rider: 16, by Raymond Impanis (1947-1963) and Servais Knaven (1995-2010). – 15, Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle.
Oldest winner: Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle, 38 years and 8 months in 1993.
Largest winning margin (postwar): 5 minutes and 21 seconds, when Eddy Merckx beat Roger De Vlaeminck in 1970.
Closest margin of victory: 1 cm (0.39 in), between Eddy Planckaert and Steve Bauer in 1990.
Slowest victory: 12 hours and 15 minutes, in 1919 when Henri Pélissier won on roads devastated by World War I.
Fastest Edition: Peter Post averaged 45.1 kph to win in 1964.
Longest victorious break: 222 km (138 mi), by Dirk Demol in 1988.

 

BE A NINJA. AN AIRPORT NINJA.

We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for everything from an XS to XXL road bike, cases for bikes with integrated seatposts, and even some mountain bikes. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

Orucase Airport Ninja


Classics Season Is Upon Us March 21 2017

After a thrilling Milan-San Remo last weekend we’re headed to the first cobbled classics of the season!

And by we I mean keep your eyes open for some Airport Ninjas that are headed to the classics with Pro-tour teams and some of your favorite cycling websites. Be sure to share your travels with us on Instagram @Orucase.

The first cobbled classic is E3-Harelbeke this Friday March 24th. Nicknamed ‘The Little Tour of Flanders’, I think the question on everybody's mind is whether Sagan will finish 1st or 2nd this season at every classic.

 

The Lowdown on E3 Harelbeke

Coming just a week before the Tour of Flanders, E3 is viewed as a great tune up as it features many of the same roads and climbs as its big brother. Steep climbs, narrow twisty roads, and wind make it a quintessential Flandrian race. Doing well here will put you on the list of favorites for the the Tour of Flanders.

The race is generally a touch over 200km, starting and finishing in Harelbeke. 10-20 short, cobbled climbs are spattered throughout the last 90km, and due to the shambolic nature of the roads local knowledge and experience riding them can make all the difference.

The Climbs

The Paterburg is one of the hardest climbs to grace E3. 400 meters in length, with an average gradient of 12.5% and topping out at 20% make it a decisive moment for both E3 and Tour of Flanders. Now a protected monument, the road was unpaved until 1986 when a local farmer placed the cobblestones because he wanted the Tour of Flanders to pass by his house!

Paterberg in de gelijknamige straat - België.jpg
By Spotter2 - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

 

Oude Kwaremont is the other definitive berg en route. 2.2 kilometers long averages only 4.2%, but maxes out at 11% on a particularly narrow and uneven cobble section.

 

Trivia

First Edition: First held in 1958 it is one of youngest one day classics.

Fastest Edition: Dutchman Steven de Jong, won at an average speed of 45.9 km/h in 2003.

Most Wins: Tom ‘TommekeTommekeTommeke’ Boonen won 5 editions, with 4 in a row! 2004, 2005, 2006 2007, and 2012.

 

Be a ninja. An Airport Ninja.

We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for everything from an XS to XXL road bike, cases for bikes with integrated seatposts, and even some mountain bikes. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Travel Case

 


5 Musical Genres (And Songs) To Spice Up Your Cycling. March 13 2017

Did you know that listening to music can provide a small, but statistically significant boost in performance?

 Whether you're stuck on the rollers banging out hour of powers, or on the road doing sweet spot, threshold, or Vo2 a good song, can help you get in the groove. Research has shown that music can help you achieve flow state easier. Furthermore, it's been demonstrated that during submaximal exercise listening to music can reduced perceived exertion by up to 10%.

Here's a list of some of our favorite musical genres for training to and a selection of songs that we've listened to countless times during our cycling careers.

 1. Trance

Trance came into existence during the 90's. Characterized by a tempo of 125 to 150 beats per minute, repetitive melodic phrases, and drops. The name itself may refer to euphoria, chills, or uplifting rush that listeners can experience.

The longer track lengths, and ability to get lost in the song made trance our go to genre for longer threshold efforts and riding the rollers through the rough Vermont winters. 

 

 

 2. Drum and Bass

Another electronic genre that came into existence in the early 90's, known for fast tempo (160-180bpm), and it's heavy bass and sub-bass lines. Songs here are generally shorter, and the fast tempo make it more ideal for vo2 or anaerobic intervals when your cadence is high.

 

3. House

House music arose in Chicago during the 1980's. Known for its four on the floor beats (4/4) and synthesized basslines. House shares a lot in common with disco, as well as the soul and funk it samples, while being more electronic and minimal than those genres using the repetitive rhythm of the song to create the groove.

 

4. Footwork

Footwork is a direct descendant of chicago house music. A dance battle music, it utilizes super fast techy drums with heavy bass while sampling everything from soul, funk, and Hip-hop.

 

5. Techno

Techno is the last stop on our list and also a creation of the 1980's from Detroit. Techno is a generally repetitive electronic dance music, in the range of 120-150bpm that uses a 4/4 beat with a bass drum on every quarter note.

 

Well, that wraps up our look into 5 different genres of music and some examples of notable tracks that we've used to get us through many, many intervals, and even more miles of riding. Leave a comment here, on twitter @paynobikefees, or on Instagram @Orucase if you want us to explore a genre more in depth or a new one. Always happy to tell you our favorite songs for riding.

While you're listening be sure to check out our Airport Ninja bike case. It's the only bike travel case designed by cyclists to avoid excess baggage fees. It does this by being the only case that can be built under the 62 linear inch airline limit, and is also available in sizes to fit everything from an XS to an XXL. It's the smallest and lightest bike bag available!

learn more orucase airport ninja 

 


Bike Travel Cases Under 62 Linear Inches? March 07 2017

Well, you've found us... The only bicycle case designed by cyclists that can come in under the 62 linear inch airline limit.

Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Travel Case under 62 linear inches

 

As former bike racers, traveling with a hardshell case was a pain. Not only is it heavy and cumbersome, but the fees killed us.  That's why we used our experience and some tricks of the trade to design the Airport Ninja, the only bicycle travel case that can come in under 62 linear inches. 

We build every bike case to order in house, this allows us to accommodate every customer's unique needs, while building the highest quality product. We can build cases for everything from an XS to XXL road bike, cases for bikes with integrated seatposts, and even full suspension mountain bikes. The best part is that compared to a traditional hardshell case design ours requires only one additional step in packing, the removal of the fork! If you remove your cranks we can make it even smaller, shoot us an email to hear all your options. The next time you get charged $150+ each way traveling with your bicycle, remember that the Airport Ninja Bike Case is the solution to stop paying bike fees!

 

Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Case


Our 5 Winter Cycling Gear Favorites. February 22 2017

Last week we wrote about some tricks of the trade we've picked up from cycling for a combined 20+ years, most of them in Vermont. Which, if you've never been there, is quite cold in the winter. Some might say Arctic.

ccb winter

Our love of cycling and design has lead us to continually refine our gear of choice, and due to those years in Vermont we've found some favorite winter cycling gear. Check out last week's blog on our tips and tricks to survive riding in cold weather, or scroll down to check out some of our favorite winter gear.

 

7 MORE COLD WEATHER RIDING TIPS AND TRICKS FROM PRO CYCLISTS.

Orucase's 5 Winter Cycling Gear Favorites.

  

1. It all starts with a base.

Having 3+ different weight baselayers can really help set the foundation for the rest of your clothing on that day. We’re a big fan of Craft baselayers and use a combination of those with our cycling kits depending on the weather forecast and type of riding we'll be doing.

orucase winter cycling gear favorites craft baselayers

2. Hats on hats.

Did you know that roughly 30% of your body’s heat is lost through the head? Combining a warm winter hat with a helmet can be tough. Although as soon as the merino wool Rapha Winter Hat came out I bought one. Still going strong after 12 years.

orucase winter cycling gear favorites rapha hat

3. Minimal Gore-Tex Shells.

Having a thin, stoppable shell can make all the difference on extremely cold days, and long descents.  Our favorite was Gore Bike Wear's. A minimal design, with one small pocket and no vents allows it to stuff easily into a jersey pocket.

Orucase winter cycling gear favorites Gore Bike wear gore-tex jacket

4. Insulated bottles.

The Camelbak Podium Big Chill 25oz Bottle was our favorite for long winter rides. It allowed us to keep a 2.5-3 standard bottles worth of warm drinks without having to stop and refill.

Orucase winter cycling gear favorites camelbak insulated bottles

5. Knog Lights.

With less daylight, and poorer visibility, being seen is important. At Orucase we want you to go unseen in the airport, not the road... Having a small rechargeable light can be helpful when you get that flat or bonk and are chasing the sunlight home. We've always liked the Knog lights, usb rechargeable, quick release, and small.

Orucase Winter cycling gear favorites Knog lights

We hope this gear helps you make it through the rest of winter. If you haven't, check out our last week's post on tips and tricks to keep you warm in the winter. If you want to start traveling with you bicycle more be sure to check out our Airport Ninja bicycle travel case. It's the only case that can be built under the 62 linear inch airline limit, and is also available in sizes to fit everything from an XS to an XXL.

Orucase Airport Ninja Learn More


7 More Cold Weather Riding Tips and Tricks From Pro Cyclists. February 15 2017

SNOWY ROAD

Spring is right around the corner, and with multiple feet of snow being dumped all over, it’s time to buckle down and do the training. If you want to be fast, there's no more off days just because the weather isn’t ideal. 

We might make the best bicycle travel case, but YOU still have to do the riding! 

We spent our formative years living in Vermont and training through the winter. Known for brutally cold, gray winters, we once experienced an entire month below 10 degrees fahrenheit. Needless to say combining this with our racing careers has lead to extensive knowledge on how to ride in any conditions. This week check out Part 1 of our cold weather cycling tips and tricks. Scroll down for the lowdown on some of the lesser known tips and tricks learned from our years racing bikes professionally. Next week we'll cover some of our favorite cold weather cycling gear in Part 2.

Give us a like on Facebook (@Orucase), and share this article for a chance to win a 20% off coupon!

Winter cycling up App Gap Vermont

80 Miles Below Freezing

 

Pro Cold Weather Cycling Tips and Tricks

1. Two Pairs of gloves. 

An ice climbing trick (and probably the only way to survive ice climbing without getting frostbite) is to bring 2-3 pairs of gloves with you. A light set makes it nice to do intervals and have that solid grip with the bars that some heavier gloves leave to be desired. Once the intervals or group riding has chilled out you can throw on a heavier set to get you home.  Ideally you can stuff the gloves you’re not using under your armpits to keep them warm.

 

2. Vapor barrier liners. 

A trick from the extreme ends of climbing, and backpacking. A vapor barrier is an impermeable, non-breathable layer that essentially creates a microclimate inside of it. Once you start to sweat, and heat up said sweat, your body tones it down, and uses that thin layer as insulation. The trick is dressing just warm enough for the vapor barrier to work. The plus side is that you can stay warm in extreme cold with very thin layers on, the downside is once you stop moving and the layer of sweaty air cools, you will too!  The best example of this is using latex gloves under a thin set of riding gloves. Or using plastic bags over your socks and under your shoes. In extreme conditions or rapidly deteriorating conditions one can use plastic bags on the head, and torso to make it back in one piece.

 

3. Warm beverages.

Having a warm drink to sip on makes it more enjoyable riding, especially staying hydrated as cold weather dampens the desire to drink.  Keeping any combination of tea, drink mix, coffee in your bottles can make the difference! Skratch Labs makes a hot Apple and Cinnamon drink mix, although tea and honey is a tried and true mixture as well.

 

4. Pam.

For extra sloppy conditions a thin coating of Pam cooking spray on your drivetrain can keep the mud and grit off.

 

5. Lower your tire pressure.

Back in the day everyone seemed to run 120 PSI all the time, and I never quite understood why. I’ve been racing criteriums on 95 PSI for quite some time. The increased grip that it provides makes cornering and stopping much easier, and can even be faster. In sloppy conditions running 80 PSI can give you that extra grip you need to survive that iced over turn. An added bonus is that at even lower pressure you can get the same intensity at lower speeds, resulting in less wind chill!

 CCB WINTER RIDE

"...make sure to not over apply embrocation, or else it will feel like your legs are re-entering the atmosphere..."

6. Embrocation.

There are plenty of good embrocations out there. Just make sure to not over apply the first time around, or else it will feel like your legs are re-entering the atmosphere the rest of the day.  Embro will help on those wet days where any clothing you wear becomes waterlogged.  In a pinch homemade embro can be made using vaseline/oil and cayenne pepper.

 

7. Vaseline.

Applying a thin layer of vaseline or other similar oily tincture on your face can take the bite off of freezing wind. If you’ve ever experienced air so cold that your tears freeze and your nostrils stick together with each breathe you’ll know how much this can help.

 

We hope these tips and tricks help you make it through the rest of winter. Stay tuned next week to see a roundup of some of our favorite cold weather cycling gear. If you want to start traveling with you bicycle more be sure to check out our Airport Ninja bicycle travel case. It's the only case that can be built under the 62 linear inch airline limit, and is also available in sizes to fit everything from an XS to an XXL.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ORUCASE AIRPORT NINJA BIKE CASE


Can You Believe How Much This Junior Cyclist Was Charged To Fly With His Bike? February 09 2017

Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve reached a new level of insanity when it comes to traveling with a bicycle. Bicycling Magazine posted this article this morning. check it out.

Bicycling bike fee article

 

First of all, Noah Simms, if you’re out there, please get in contact with us. If We want to help you become an airport ninja.

Bike racing is an inherently expensive sport.  We remember how stressful it can be to make ends meet as juniors, U23, and collegiate racers. As aspiring pros, bike fees were just another obstacle conspiring to keep us away from the important races we dreamt about. We invented the Airport Ninja so we could focus on crossing the finish line, not on getting to the start line. When a Junior cyclocross racer traveling to World Championships get charged $577 for excess baggage fees, we’re here to help.

Because of Noah’s experience we’re currently working on getting a program in place to be able to help juniors offset the initial cost of traveling with an Orucase Airport Ninja. Stay tuned for more!

 

Orucase Airport Ninja Buy Now


Tucson Bonus: Box Canyon January 25 2017

110 Miles, 20+ miles of Dirt: Box Canyon.

Probably our most epic day in Tucson. I think we ended up spending 8+ hours on the bike for a grand total of 110 miles, and chasing the sunlight home.  Box Canyon will take you on some familiar roads, and then connect them with a solid 20 miles of dirt roads in the canyon. The route finding will take a little longer, and the dirt/sand can make the first few miles a little tough, but this ride is totally worth it!

 

Box Canyon Strava

Download GPX TCX

 

If you like what you see here be sure to check out our previous post on our Cyclist's Guide To Tucson.

 

The Cyclist's Guide To: Tucson

The cyclists guide to tucson


The Cyclist's Guide To: Tucson January 09 2017

January can only mean one thing. It’s time to get down to Tucson and put in some miles.

 

Racing bikes has it's perks. The Orucase team has traveled and raced all over the world. This has given us a unique, on the ground (or in the saddle) view of all the major cycling destinations across the US. We'll be visiting a different city each month in our blog to showcase the top rides, top food, top bike shops, and other cool features of well known cycling cities.

For January we start with Tucson. Every winter, right after the holidays, we'd head down to Tucson to train the house down. We’ve done it all, from renting a 1 bedroom apartment for the three of us the day we moved there, to living in a condo complex that had real grass lawns!

Constant sun, a nice 80 degrees, dry, and moderate altitude make Tucson a great place to spend the winter riding. Not to mention Mt. Lemmon which has 21 miles of uninterrupted climbing at 5%, before a little dip down and another 7 miles up to a cookie store (we’ll touch back on that later). The city and its roads are spread out, but once you've read this you'll have no trouble finding your way around.

 

Where to Live

Tucson

When we moved to Tucson for the first time we didn't anticipate the size of the city. The street grid is massive, and can take a bit of time to ride across.  We lived in North Eastern Tucson the first year, near Mt. Lemmon, and this limited our riding west of town.  From then on out we lived in the Catalina Foothills area.  This North central location allows easy access to rides on all sides of the city, is a bit quieter and has awesome views of Mt. Lemmon in your backyard.

Catalina Foothills

 

The Group Ride

The Shootout

What would Tucson be without The Shootout? Bring your A game for a fast and furious hammerfest heading south out of Tucson. Try and stay near the front, plus, you never know who might show up and drop you...

Danny Pate Shootout Tucson

What: A mega group ride, we're talking 1-200 riders, that rolls out of town slowly before hammering to the top of Shootout hill before regrouping and then hammering back into town.

When: Saturdays at 7:30, keeps moving earlier to 6:30 later in the winter.

Where: The Starbucks at University.

Shootout Strava

Download GPX TCX

 

Tip #1: Bring extra clothes for the ride to the start, it can be below freezing before the sun rises in Tucson.

Bonus #1: Get some extra miles by heading out with the big boys to climb Madera Canyon, a 13 mile climb before heading back to Tucson. A good way to get in 100-120 miles @ 23mph+.

 

The Rides

Old Spanish Trail

A great rolling road on the east end of town, perfect for filling in some extra miles on the way back from Mt. Lemmon.

OLD SPANISH TRAIL STRAVA

Download GPX TCX 

 

Gates Pass + Big Square

A short steep climb with some cool views at the top before dropping down into "Old Tucson" sets you up for tackling Big Square, a big flat square on the north west edge of town. Head back into town on Picture Rock Road, but watch out for traffic!

 Gates pass + big square strava

Download GPX TCX 

 

Kitt Peak

Supertraining defined. A ~120 mile out and back, on one road. But you'll be treated an 11 mile climb @ 6% up to an observatory with awesome 360 degree views of the desert before heading back to town.

Kitt Peak Strava

Download GPX TCX

 

Mt. Lemmon 

A total 29 miles to the summit. With the first 21 miles of continuous climbing at 5% grade. You’ll start at a modest 2,700ft and climb all the way up to 9,133ft passing through numerous climates and some awesome views. The climb starts at mile marker in the northeast corner of Tucson. The intersection of East Catalina Highway and East Snyder Road.

Mt. Lemmon Strava

Download GPX TCX

 

Bonus #1: Ride up to the summit and check out http://thecookiecabin.org/

Bonus #2: A good time from mile marker 0 to mile 5 is 20 minutes. Although certain other cookie aficionados have done it in under 18.

 

The Food

Tucson's got it all. From trendy spots downtown by the university, to real authentic Mexican food, to cafes. We used to use our recovery rides to go try a different mexican restaurant every time, however this might make it hard to ride uphill home.

 

El guero Canelo tucson

El Guero Canelo: Sonoran Hotdogs (You should google that if you've never seen one) and Mexican street food.

 

nicos tucson

Nico’s: Awesome lunch spot with Mexican street food.  Amazing Burritos, Carnitas was my go to.  Best of all they have multiple spots all over Tucson.

 

1702 tucson

1702 Pizza & Beer: The name says it all. They serve up mega sized slices of pizza with a extensive beer list.

 

le buzz tucson

Le Buzz Caffe: Cafe at the base of Mt. Lemmon. Perfect for easy days.

 

the cookie cabin

The Cookie Cabin: The aforementioned cabin that sells mega sized cookies on top of Mt. Lemmon.  

 

The Bike Shops

 

Fairwheel Bikes
The Shop to go to in Tucson. These are the same guys who routinely build sub 8 pound road bikes with all manner of bespoke carbon parts. Check 'em out. They have info on other group rides as well.



Arizona Cyclist

A high end shop at the base of the foothills. They've helped us out multiple times. A good place to stop for ride food and service.

 

Bonus

If you're feeling lucky check out The Desert Diamond Casino on Nogales Highway.

Jackpot

 

What's next for Orucase's Cyclist Guide?

Tune in next time as we tackle another favorite city of ours, or better yet sign up for our mailing list to be automatically entered to win an Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Case.

 

Orucase Buy Now


2017: The Year of The Ninja. January 02 2017

Here's what you missed in 2016

2017 will be the year of the airport ninja! Here's a roundup of our best and most popular moments of 2016. We've included reviews from CyclingTips, and PezCyclingNews. Articles that mention us from Bicycling Magazine, and BikeRadar. Awards for Companies we work with from InterBike. As well as our most popular blog posts, a mix of knowledge we've picked up from racing over the years, and information to help you save even more money the next time you fly.

 

Ninja Blur

 

CyclingTips Review

CyclingTips Logo

"...Just as Orucase says, the Airport Ninja drew little attention from airline gate agents. Not one asked what was inside the inconspicuous black case and on only one occasion did I pay a supplemental fee (for additional luggage, not a bike) — offsetting the purchase price of the case by more than threefold after just four round-trip journeys..."

Read the rest of the Review here

https://cyclingtips.com/news/orucase-airport-ninja-bike-travel-case-review/

 

Pez Cycling News Review

"...The Oru Airport Ninja travel case is light & sturdy, big enough to pack a full sized bicycle, but small enough to avoid those hefty fees the airlines love to charge to anyone travelling with a bike.  Matt McNamara flew his to Asia, and returned with this review..."

PezCyclingNews

 

Bicycling Magazine

5 Bike Cases That Evade the Airline Bike Fee

"...One of the coolest features of the case is that it’s built custom, so the size is perfectly matched to your bike..."

Bicycling Magazine

 

Bike Radar Holiday Cycling Gifts

We made Bike Radar's annual holiday gift guide, for the cyclist who has everything!

Bike Radar Gift Ideas

 

 

Interbike & CrossVegas
One highlight of our trip to Interbike was seeing NDVR Cycles win a best of award from Gear Patrol.  NDVR designed from the ground up the best breakaway styled bike utilizing designs and manufacturing made in the US from the like of Niner, Lynskey, and Orucase.  We're proud to say that we make in house 100% of the sub 62 inch travel cases that come with every bicycle purchased from NDVR.
NDVR Interbike
 
And we got to watch our boy from Vermont, Jamey Driscoll, throw down at CrossVegas.
Jamey
 
 

Our Top 3 Blog Posts

1. The clear winner.  A short list of tips and tricks we've learned from our combined 20+ years of bike racing.

5 Tricks Pro Bike Racers Don't Want You To Know About Riding In Cold, Wet Weather.

 5 TRICKS PRO BIKE RACERS DON’T WANT YOU TO KNOW ABOUT RIDING IN COLD, WET WEATHER.

 

2. Why being a sprinter kinda sucks...

The Plight Of The Sprinter

The Plight of the sprinter

 

3. Our guide to airline baggage policies.

The Airport Ninja's Guide To Airlines

THE AIRPORT NINJA'S GUIDE TO AIRLINES.

  

Here's to a year full of tailwinds.


Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (and Bikes). 5 Ways To Travel With Your Airport Ninja. December 14 2016

We’ve already touted The Airport Ninja’s ability to fly for free. But what about the rest of the trip?

Flying is just one leg of your journey. You’ve got to get to the airport in the first place and depending on where you are and how many people you are traveling with you might have to accomplish this in a variety of ways.  The Airport Ninja stands out in all aspects of traveling with a bike.

Walking with The Airport Ninja

Walking: Our soft-shell construction and small size make our case the easiest to carry. Backpack straps allow you to free up your hands and use your strongest muscles.  Did we mention the case weighs only 9 pounds?

Cycling: A true Airport Ninja can ride to the airport with our case on their back and pack their bicycle right there, the only tools needed are a small multitool and pedal wrench.

Automobiles: Have you ever tried to fit multiple hard cases into a car? Due to our much smaller dimensions it is possible to fit up to twice as many Airport Ninja cases with bikes into the back of your car or a rental.  Perfect for team camps or vacation with friends.  Our soft-shell design also allows The Airport Ninja to be stored virtually flat, freeing up trunk space if you have access to a vehicle with a bike rack.

This space saving ability and lightweight make it much easier to travel by taxi or bus in faraway places. Remember, the US is the only place you’ll find a Big Rig Suburban XXL rental as the norm.

Trains: Clockwork like efficiency, used extensively in Europe and Asia. A little known fact. Our case is the only Cycling case on the market that meets the luggage size requirements in multiple European countries. Namely, France and Italy. Don’t be left behind on your next trip to two of the most popular countries for cycling.

Planes: 'Nuff Said.

 

Happy Holidays from Orucase. 2017 is the year to unleash your inner ninja.

 

THE BEST BIKE CASE TO TRAVEL OR FLY WITH A BICYCLE

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only airline travel case for bicycles designed by cyclists to minimize and eliminate excess baggage fees. Pack smart, pack stealth with the smallest cycling travel case on the market and become an Airport Ninja today.
The Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Case for Air Travel

The Plight of The Sprinter December 06 2016

Or why being a sprinter is awesome, but kinda sucks most of the time.

As I start training on the bike again, I’m reminded of the very hardships sprinters face.  Sure, I can still bang out 1600+ watts and win a town line sprint, but for the other 3 hours, 59 minutes and 45 seconds of that ride I’ll be holding on for dear life, just hoping they don’t hammer up the next hill.

Although, I don’t suppose it was much different when I raced, sure I was faster, but I was still holding on to the only part of reality that made any sense when you’re digging that deep, the wheel in front of you.  I guess that’s the Yin and Yang of cycling though.  The strongmen have to get rid of the sprinters to win, and we just need to hold on.

Bike Race Suffer

And that’s what makes cycling awesome, the diverse physiology of riders. Where a specific skill set, make up of muscle fibers, fitness, and tactics can make the difference between which single racer will win out of 100.

I still say that just riding the sprinters have it harder and less enjoyable, maybe it’s time for a come back…

 

THE BEST BIKE CASE TO TRAVEL OR FLY WITH A BICYCLE

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only airline travel case for bicycles designed by cyclists to minimize and eliminate excess baggage fees. Pack smart, pack stealth with the smallest cycling travel case on the market and become an Airport Ninja today.
The Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Case for Air Travel

5 Tricks Pro Bike Racers Don’t Want You To Know About Riding In Cold, Wet Weather. November 22 2016

Cold weather is finally upon us. Here's some lesser known tricks for dealing with riding in cold or wet weather.

Flying with an Airport Ninja has its perks. You probably don’t pay any crazy baggage fees for you bike anymore, which means you can fly with it more. The downside is by traveling and flying with your bike more, you’re more likely to end up in cold and wet weather at one of your destinations.  If the weather goes south, and you didn’t pack any rain or cold weather clothes, don’t worry we’ve got you covered with some tips we’ve picked up over the years.

Orucase Airport Ninja's riding bikes in the snow

 

  1. Latex gloves. If you’ve ever rode in the rain you know that waterproof is the only way to go. Neoprene gloves are a must have, nothing else will keep you warm with spray from your tires and other riders. A cheap alternative is using a latex glove inside whatever gloves you have.  It acts as a vapor barrier liner and is very efficient at retaining heat/moisture (it's why your hands sweat using latex gloves in warm/hot conditions.
  2. Plastic bags. Booties always seem to be hit or miss.  Racing and training in Vermont we were always dealing with 40-50 deg rain and snow. One trick is to stock up on some plastic grocery bags.  Put on your wool socks, place the bags over them and insert them into your shoes. You can tuck the upper opening of the bags inside your legwarmers, as well as placing booties over your shoes for extra warmth.
  3. This is the trick you’ve all seen if you watch the Tour de France.  Place newspaper (or more plastic bags) over your chest beneath your jersey.
  4. If it’s too cold outside, you can keep your insides warm with hot tea or coffee. The insulated bottles out there are great for this.
  5. Homemade embro. The teammate who did this will remain nameless to protect his identity.  Back in the frozen north that is Vermont, at one of my first ever collegiate races a teammate pulled out a bottle of homemade embro.  It was vaseline/oil mixed with cayenne pepper. Use at your own discretion.

 

THE BEST BIKE CASE TO TRAVEL OR FLY WITH A BICYCLE

The Orucase Airport Ninja is the only airline travel case for bicycles designed by cyclists to minimize and eliminate excess baggage fees. Pack smart, pack stealth with the smallest cycling travel case on the market and become an Airport Ninja today.
The Orucase Airport Ninja Bike Case for Air Travel